Other Langauge Home
General | Alta | BC | Man | NB | Nfld | NS | NWT | Nun | Ont | PEI | Que | Sask | Yuk | Federal
Safe Workplaces
Unsafe Work
Workers' Compensation
Workplace Dangers
You Have a Say

Prince Edward Island

Safe Workplaces: The Right to a Safe and Healthy Workplace

Regulations respecting workers' right to a safe and healthy workplace address only certain workplace hazards. Not all workplace hazards are regulated, and in the various jurisdictions, hazards are regulated differently. Here is a sample of common workplace hazards and the regulations meant to limit or eliminate those hazards. Compare the regulations in Prince Edward Island with regulations in the other provinces and territories.

Ergonomic hazards in the office can cause musculo skeletal injury (MSI) or repetitive strain injury (RSI). The injury "carpel tunnel syndrome" is an example. Regulations followed by the employer are meant to protect office workers from MSI. What is the regulation on MSI respecting workers' right to a safe and healthy workplace?

Only Saskatchewan and British Columbia have regulations on the prevention of MSI in the workplace. The federal workplace jurisdiction and Manitoba will be passing ergonomics regulations soon.

Two main health effects of working with noise are hearing loss and stress. Workplace noise can be caused by traffic, pneumatic tools, power tools, machinery, ventilation systems, humans and animals, for example. Regulations followed by the employer are meant to protect workers from too much noise. What is the regulation on noise respecting workers' right to a safe and healthy workplace?

Noise exposure limits in PEI workplaces are found in the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations under the provincial Occupational Health and Safety Act. An employer must ensure that workers are not working with noise levels above the limit set in the regulation. For an 8 hour shift in a 24 hour period, the limit is 85 decibels. If the worker works with noise for more than 8 hours in a 24 hour period, or for less than 8 hours in a 24 hour period, then the employer has to control the noise level according to the precise noise levels and work hours set in the regulation.

Warning signs have to mark areas where the noise level is above 85 decibels. If the noise level is higher than the legal limit, then the employer has to separate the worker from the source of the noise; and if that's not possible, then the employer supplies the worker with the type of hearing protection equipment specified in the regulation. For a worker working with a noise level at, or above the legal limit, the employer organizes a hearing test at the start of the worker's employment, and once a year after that.

Regulations followed by the employer are meant to protect workers from hazardous materials, like workplace chemicals. What is the regulation on hazardous materials respecting workers' right to a safe and healthy workplace?

Regulations in every province, territory, and in the federal workplace jurisdiction state that employers must educate and train workers on certain hazardous workplace materials. These materials are "classified", or named, in the Workplace Hazardous Material Information System (WHMIS). Click here for more information on WHMIS.

Some workplace materials that might be hazardous are not classified under WHIMS. These materials include cosmetics, pesticides, and objects made of wood. Hazardous materials classified under WHMIS include compressed gas, flammable and combustible materials, oxidizing materials, poisonous and infectious materials, corrosive materials and dangerously reactive materials. Each comes with a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) and a WHMIS warning label.

The MSDS and the WHMIS warning label explain the dangers of the material and how to work safely with it. In order to better protect the worker, the employer trains the worker in reading the WHMIS label and data sheet, on safely using the hazardous material, and on responding to a spill, release, fire or poisoning.

Working alone is not always hazardous, but it can be, especially when there is an injury or other emergency. Working alone is also hazardous when work is done with the public and there's a possibility of violence. Regulations followed by the employer are meant to protect workers from the hazards of working alone and from workplace violence. What is the regulation on working alone and workplace violence respecting workers' right to a safe and healthy workplace?

In Prince Edward Island, there are no regulations on protecting workers working alone. If an employer wishes, she or he can lower the hazards of working alone by:
  • communicating with workers and the joint health and safety committee or the worker health and safety representative, determining the specific hazards of working alone and limiting these hazards
  • scheduling more hazardous work to be done during regular hours when co workers can help in an emergency
  • avoiding having workers work alone
  • training workers in such things as work hazards and steps to take in case of emergency
  • putting in place a "check in procedure" which lets workers working alone keep regular contact with co workers

And while BC and Saskatchewan have specific regulations on protecting workers from violence in the workplace, PEI has no such regulation.

How do I make a complaint about my work situation?

Learn more about making a complaint in your jurisdiction

News Feeds

Canadian Labour